tech Advice

Cloud Computing In The HR Marketplace

In the HR workplace today there are many benefits to using cloud computing applications. The average corporation uses a ratio of one human resource professional to every one hundred employees and considering that many corporations are either international or perhaps dispersed across a large country, HR teams are often not all based in the same place. Additionally many people now work remotely, a perk often given by companies to appeal to those wishing to avoid a long commute, or who don’t want to place young children in daycare. Having employees work from home is also environmentally friendly, since it reduces the number of cars on the road; however, it can be very costly for businesses to set these employees up with their own hardware and software licenses and it can also be logistically difficult to service both hardware and software when an employee is not situated in an office, with an in-house IT support team available. This, of course, leads to one of the main benefits of using cloud computing applications.

They negate the need for costly hardware that can host a large software application (cloud applications are hosted on the cloud so companies do not need to provide the server space for hosting); an IT support team (cloud application providers take care of technical support); software licenses, and software installation, period; the cloud can be accessed from anywhere, anytime.

Furthermore, the HR department typically deals with sensitive information; having this information securely stored on a remote server reduces concerns about loss of information, should the company experience a breach of security or damage from fire, water or a natural disaster. HR application provider, Shift iQ, protects its data centers from these perils with the use of the latest VESDA smoke-detection technology and FE-25 clean-agent fire-suppression technology. Cloud computing application …

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What Free Anti Virus Protection should you Use?

If your computer connects to another computer in any way at all – through shared storage media of any kind, through the Internet or through a common network, you can be somewhat sure that your computer is exposed to malware of some kind. Last year, when the StuxNet worm swept through the world’s computers, it was noted how it seemed to be attacking lots of computers that didn’t even connect to the Internet. Thumb drives and all manner of other things make it possible. The thing is, there’s just no need for this. There’s so much free anti virus protection available that’s exactly as good as the paid stuff (not that the paid stuff costs anything much).

Search on Google for free anti virus protection, and you will fairly be overwhelmed by the sheer range of choice. Just about every paid antivirus company out there from Avast to AVG, from Avira to Ad-Aware, has a free product out there (is it just me, or do antivirus makers prefer names that start with the letter A more than anything). Best advice? Get a good expert like experienced Aberdeen IT support  company, Pisys.net – they can help out in most cases.

Of course, as much as is available, you can have a bit of trouble making the correct choice. Which way do you go?

Your antivirus needs two kinds of ability. It needs the ability to detect viruses on a computer already present when it is installed, and it needs to be able to detect new threats that appear after the installation occurs. Most people don’t think of it this way. They think that if antivirus has one kind of ability, it’s a given that it will perform well the other way too. Well, we’re going to rate popular free anti …